Enjoying a trip through Saxony - That's how Saxon tastes! A culinary travel report about Dresden and Meissen

Dresden. Here I am. In my heavenly blue hotel room in the venerable Hotel Elbflorenz. Not directly on the Elbe, but next to the Dresdner World Trade Center. They like big names, the Dresdners.
Over my bed, the two most famous angels of art history stare past me, seemingly disinterested. As I learn later, they hang not only over my bed, but in every room here in the hotel. And of course, in the original by Raffael, in the Sempergalerie in the Dresden Zwinger, a stone's throw away on the other Elbe side.
In this cozy hotel room with rustic wicker furniture I start an exciting journey: That's how Saxon tastes! is the slogan of the three-day tour around Dresden, which will also be attended by Björn von Herzfutter, Mia von Kochkarussell and Mira von funnypilgrim. The Bloggerreise is part of the campaign So goes Saxon. and we are allowed to put the region around Dresden through its paces and experience it as a culinary experience. For me it's a premiere - I've never been to Dresden or Saxony before.
I land in the middle of the night feeling the smallest airport in the world and Mia and I treat ourselves to an extensive hotel breakfast before our program starts at noon and we meet the others.

With the nicest chauffeur In the world we drive in our black minibus along the Elbe until the road leads us to Meissen. Meissen, Meissen ... Of course, Meissen porcelain, you know that. The charming little town with its castle, its cathedral and its medieval old town is somehow known but otherwise not really. That has to change and so we get an extended tour of the city, cross the marketplace, climb up the steps to Albrecht Castle and Meissen Cathedral and stop again and again. Meissen was largely spared attacks during the Second World War and so an impressive architecture stretches through the entire city center. It's quaint, it's rustic and it's homey. We also learn the story of the Meißner Fummel, a very special pastry with an old tradition. It tastes like air and nothing, but that's not the point. The story is beautiful, the tradition very exciting and even today the fumble is a classic gift for the wedding. The bride and groom must then pay particular attention that their fumble does not break - that brings otherwise misfortune!
The people here are friendly and they are proud of their small town and its history. And they hold together - especially when the lower half of the city is heavily damaged by the Elbe flood. Many shops are empty, no one wants to rent more, no insurance wants to insure. In Meissen the youth is missing. And yet, so many residents feel connected to their city - in the porcelain manufactory, the average length of service is at least 30 years. It is also the largest employer in the region and a true tourist magnet. One has prepared for this: in addition to a museum, which leads one through the history of the company, you can enjoy local specialties of the finest porcelain in the in-house café.

It's getting cold and dark now and we have to keep going. It goes to a vineyard. Vineyard? In Meissen, in the middle of Saxony? In fact, Saxony is one of the smallest regions in the world, accounting for about 0.2% of German viticulture. Nevertheless, special features such as the Gold Riesling are grown here. Anja Fritz greets us on her Mariaberg with a hot cup of mulled wine around the campfire. We glimpse the vines on the slope, while we are warmly warmed around the crackling fire and listen to Anja's stories. Rather by accident, she came to the wine. But now she lives him with such a passion that you can only listen to her banned. In the rustic cellar we sit comfortably and eat local ham and cheese specialties and Schmalzbrote (or even better: Fettbemmen!) And enjoy Anja's wines. What a variety of flavors thrive on this little piece of earth! The prices are a bit higher than you might otherwise drink, but the delicious drops are definitely worth it. On the way back along the Elbe, we ponder the beautiful day and the delicious pleasures we were allowed to experience.

Saturday greets us with thick gray rain and clouds. But we will not spoil our spirits and leave for an Eat The World Tour in Dresden Neustadt. Falk is our tour guide for the next few hours and leads us confidently through the trendy district. The exciting thing about these tours is the link between culinary and classic city tours. We learn a lot about this beautiful district from the Wilhelminian era, which was largely spared during the war. Not for nothing it is so popular with students and young families. During our three-hour walk we stop again and again and enjoy original Dresdner Eierschecke, the first Dresdner Christstollen this year, sweet and hearty Baumstriezel in the Baumstriezel manufactory, the cheese specialty Dresdner Berle in the cheese corner Schlüter and Russian Pelmeni Pils in the Raskolnikoff. Also, a visit to the English Café England, England must not be missed and in the end the feet are tired and the bellies full, but we have seen a lot and tried.But we do not cook somewhere, but at Dresden Airport! As I said at the beginning, the airport looks pretty small, but in the evening, when nothing is going on and you are cooking in a small group, it is quite big and a bit scary. But Georg is a great guy - together with him we can sizzle and chop and schnippeln. We are all a bit exhausted from the day tour so he serves us the courses after we have prepared them all together. There are goose and trout, Dresdner stollen in a parfait, Navettesübchen and chestnut soup. Much is regional, but some also reinterpreted. In the end we all agree: Saxon tastes really good! Tired and full, we fall into bed and sleep like stones.

Sunday goes it on the Dresden pleasure market. On the old slaughterhouse area you can stroll along the various stalls, look, buy and of course eat again! Regional suppliers present coffee, ice cream, baked goods, spices, tea, pasta and much more. The halls fill up fast, there are cuts, by chance we meet Lutz from the Plötzblog, who bakes wonderfully crispy fresh spelled buns. At Uncle Franz's stand, we learn of its great concept of approaching local farmers and local producers, collecting the fresh goods there, delivering them to the Dresden restaurants and offering them to end customers in a retail store. The last local tomatoes are laid out, the first cabbages are already there. Aurochs salami joins local beer and specialty cheeses from the surrounding area. A very fabulous concept, which ensures the preservation of small businesses in the surrounding area. Please, more of it!

After reading and tasting our program is already over. But there is still some time left for the return trip and our little tour group is now deciding on the classic tour program. The old town of Dresden welcomes us with bright sunshine and we explore the Semperoper, stroll through the garden of the Zwinger and stroll through the city center to the Frauenkirche. In the afternoon, we decide on a hearty meal in the Altmarktkeller and enjoy roulades, roasts and dumplings before returning home.

On the return flight and in the following days, I let Dresden and the surrounding area review again. What a beautiful city, what a beautiful region. Sick by the war and the regular Elbe flood, you hold together here and build everything up again. Idyllic city centers, lovingly furnished shops and fascinating medieval buildings: the Meissen and Dresdeners are proud of their cities and carry them outwards too. The people are warm and happy about their guests. And they can - especially in culinary terms - really enjoy themselves here. Meissen wines, Dresdner Eierschecke, roast with dumplings and much more could inspire me and make you want more. Saxony is always worth a visit!